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Security

Clean Desk Policy

A clean desk policy can be an important tool to ensure that all sensitive/confidential materials are removed from an end-user workspace and locked away when the items are not in use or an employee leaves his/her workstation.

PLAN first thing in the morning.

Keep just the things you need for your workday on your desk. Start each day with a few minutes of planning so that you can organize the documents you need for immediate work. File all other folders and documents.

PROTECT information whenever you leave your desk.

You obviously have to leave your desk to attend meetings or to take breaks. But whenever you do, make a quick check to see if there is sensitive information on your desk and place it inside a folder or off your desktop. And for additional security, make sure to switch on your computer’s password-protected screen saver.

PICK UP at the end of the day.

When you leave your desk in the evening, don’t leave documents on it. In order to maintain the security of both your client and employee information, it’s essential to file your documents or lock them up, if necessary. If you get into the habit of cleaning off your desktop every day before you leave, you’ll enjoy the added productivity benefits that come with a clean office first thing in the morning.

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Apple Update-iOS 13.5 and iPadOS 13.5

Have you updated to iOS 13.5 or iPadOS 13.5? If not, you might want to hold off, because Apple’s back to releasing buggy updates.

iOS 13 and iPadOS 13 releases have been a bit up and down. The 13.2 release was particularly ugly and frustrating. Things settled down a bit after that, but the latest 13.5 release may be up there as one of the worst updates Apple has pushed out to iPhones and iPads in a long time.

The first issue appears to be a battery drain problem. It’s not uncommon for iOS and iPadOS updates to cause a bit of a dip in battery life, but social media is awash with people complaining of poor battery life. Even iPhone 11 Pro Max users are complaining, which is quite rare because that device has a pretty big battery.

There are also reports of users complaining about overheating.

I have come across both problems, and no amount of tweaking seems to help.

These are going to have to wait for an update. But there’s more ugliness. These are going to have to wait for an update. But there’s more ugliness.

I’ve noticed since installing iPadOS 13.5 that my iPad Pro sometime reboots shortly after logging in. Some are reporting that their iPads are stuck in a reboot loop, while others claim the problem goes back to iPadOS 13.4.1.

There are also sporadic reports of iPhones running iOS 13.5 rebooting or being stuck in reboot loops.

Another 13.5 problem that seems to date back to the 13.4.1 release is that MP4 playback is broken, with both native and third-party apps affected. 

A message common to this problem is “There’s a problem loading this content.”

If you’ve not upgraded to 13.5 yet, it might be a good time to hold back. If you have, you’ll have to ride out these bugs until Apple gets them sorted.

 

Full article: Click Here

Protect your data from Coronavirus (COVID-19) Scams

Coronavirus (COVID-19) isn’t just a growing threat to public health – it’s also a growing threat to your company’s cybersecurity. From using scary subject lines to adopting faux official letterhead, bad actors are scrambling to use the climate of fear and disruption caused by COVID-19 to their advantage.

Disasters, emergencies, and global pandemics provide a target-rich environment for cybercriminals to launch phishing attacks and employ other dirty tricks to gain access to your data. It only takes one staffer opening a bogus email, clicking on a dangerous link, or downloading a malware-laden attachment for them to succeed. Here are three ways that you can act immediately to prevent a potentially disastrous Coronavirus-related data breach.

Plan, Preserve, and Protect

Use expert guidance from agencies like CISA to prepare your organization for risks posed by COVID-19. Is your cybersecurity plan adequate for the unique challenges presented by increased virtualization if your staff is quarantined or working remotely for safety? Two-factor authentication and other tools like VPN help keep your organization’s data and systems safe even when workers aren’t in the office.

Trust but Verify

Get updates about COVID-19, scams and frauds related to the Coronavirus pandemic, and its impact on cybersecurity from trusted, official sources, and encourage your staff to only use vetted information for planning and communications. Be wary of any email with a COVID-19-related subject line, attachment, or hyperlink. Avoid sharing or clicking on social media posts, text messages, or IMs offering Coronavirus information, vaccination, treatment or cures.

Make Prevention a Priority

Refresh every staffer’s training on how to spot phishing scams and online fraud. Remind your staff that government agencies will never ask for sensitive personal, financial or business information via email. Reinforce that clicking on links or opening attachments from unfamiliar sources is a quick way for scammers to infect your systems with malware. Employee Security Awareness Training and Phishing Simulations can help make sure that your staff is ready to spot and defend against attack.

Constant vigilance against cyberattacks is a smart strategy for any business. In these uncertain times, we’re happy to be your trusted source for the tools and strategies that you need to keep cybercriminals out of your business.

Your Business is at Risk. Upgrade to Keep it Secure.

Is your business still using outdated systems? Your company could be at risk. 

Cyber threats can not only cripple a small and midsize company but also tarnish its reputation. If your company is using outdated legacy devices and running on unsupported versions of Windows operating system, it’s time to upgrade.

Stay on Outdated Systems and Become a Victim of Cyberattacks

 In 2018, cyberattacks cost businesses an average of $1.1 million per attack. With ransomware attacks and data breaches becoming a norm of everyday life, keeping your computers secure has become a priority for businesses. Hence continuing to use outdated systems is not only going to risk the business but also cost in millions.

As of January 14, 2020, Windows 7 is no longer be supported by Microsoft, which means if you are still using Windows 7 post this date, your computers will be vulnerable to cyberattacks. You will also risk being non-compliant to the industry regulations, which may affect your customers and thereby your business.

Upgrade and Stop Worrying About Security

 The security benefits of the newest version of Windows are hard to deny. Old operating systems are slow and become incompatible with software over time.

The newer version of Windows has improved privacy, transparency and enhanced security features which makes it a must for every organization. It also comes with a variety of productivity-boosting features and functions, making it easier to use.

Businesses that have not already upgraded their systems should begin to work on a migration strategy immediately.

Let us help you audit your systems and address any security vulnerabilities today.

Schedule a FREE Initial Consultation below

Medical Practice hacked with Unsupported Operating System.

The imaging devices include machines that take X-rays, MRIs, mammograms and CAT scans.

A huge proportion of internet-connected imaging devices  at hospitals run outdated operating systems, according to research released Tuesday by Palo Alto Networks, a cybersecurity firm.

Hackers could have a variety of motivations for targeting devices in hospitals. Imaging and other medical devices, such as infusion pumps and patient monitoring systems, could all be vulnerable to ransomware attacks, Olson said, noting that hospitals have already that locked down their systems and demanded payment to get them back. They could also use the machines’ computing power to mine for cryptocurrency, an attack called cryptojacking. That could cause overheating or malfunction in the device.

The research looked at 1.2 million internet-connected devices total in hospitals and other businesses. It’s a small portion of the 4.8 billion internet-connected devices that business analysis firm Gartner said existed in 2019. The data comes from Palo Alto Network customers, who use a service called Zingbox to examine all the devices connecting to their networks. The research doesn’t name specific brands of imaging devices.

 

 

Full Article: click here

Smart Speaker Spies

Amazon and Google both offer smart speakers that provide a variety of services based on voice activated commands. They also both allow third party developers to create voice apps utilizing the functionality of these devices. In the past there have been concerns over employees of Amazon or Google utilizing the always on microphone feature to eavesdrop on users. With third party developers being allowed to create and deploy apps for these devices the concern is multiplied by every third party app developed.

While Amazon and Google have vetting protocols in place to ensure that criminals can not publish malicious apps for these devices, recently Security Research Labs found two possible hacking scenarios that apply to Amazon Alexa and Google Home. You can see a full description of both these hacks here https://srlabs.de/bites/smart-spies/

SRL reported these hacks to Amazon and Google before they made them public, so that the companies could work to resolve these issues.  As with all connected devices criminals will attempt to use these smart speakers to gain valuable information. Keep in mind that unless you have muted or unplugged these devices the microphones are always on. These devices should never request your password, and if they do you should log into your account from another device to confirm the request. Also using 2 factor authentication for accounts linked to these devices will help to mitigate security concerns.

 

Pa$$Words

Strong passwords are extremely important to your personal cyber security. The list of accounts and passwords we are required to use is constantly growing. From your bank account to Amazon or Netflix, you have passwords for almost everything you do online.

As security concerns become more prevalent many of these accounts require minimum levels of password strength, and at the very least will inform you when you are using a weak password. Remembering all these complex passwords is very difficult. Especially if you take proper security precautions and use a different password for every account.

With the passwords we use becoming more complex many options have appeared to help you  keep track of the ever increasing list of passwords. Most of the browsers that you use offer the ability to store your passwords for you, and automatically log you in. While some of these are more secure than others, they are not usually the ideal solution from a security perspective.

There is another option, password managers are becoming increasingly popular, and are generally a more secure option. Some charge a monthly fee, but most offer free versions.

Below I have listed a few different password managers. They have free versions, but also offer paid versions with more features.

Bitwarden http://bitwarden.com

Last Pass http://lastpass.com

Dash Lane http://dashlane.com

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